Dating someone with borderline personality

29-Mar-2016 13:02

It can be scary, and we desperately need your support. Please know we don’t mean it and we feel tremendous amounts of guilt for doing it. It’s as if something horrible has taken over our personality and, until we’re calm, the real us doesn’t come. The guilt we feel afterwards and the longing for your forgiveness is the worst thing about it. We’re sorry in advance for waking you up for a hug during the night. For all the times our outbursts take over, the paranoia sets in or the countless times we feel we’re drowning in our own emptiness, we’re sorry. But we will love you more than you’ll ever know: For supporting us, for loving us and for staying.Broken sleep and nightmares that we desperately try to tame with medication have a way of haunting us. Here are 12 things you should know before dating someone with BPD 1.There may be a day where we wake up feeling over the moon, but before the day’s out we may just want to hide under the covers and cry.More specifically, people who are living with it experience emotions a lot more strongly than people who don’t. Bone-aching fury when your clothes horse doesn’t open, so you throw it at the wall, which makes a hole you never get around to filling in.If that sounds intractable, it’s because it really is. Or intense sensitivity to criticism, like when you don’t receive the mark you want for a university essay, so you accept a full-time job on the other side of the country, starting immediately. Here’s another fun game—try guessing how these situations go down when you’re dating.That’s not to say more accurate glimpses of BPD aren’t lurking in plain view all across popular culture.

Having BPD is like living in a bubble floating in a hazy world of detachment.Primarily embraced by various forms of media (check its extensive TV Tropes page), it also manifests itself in everyday life.The trope lambasts women for having emotions, existing mostly to invalidate feelings and to over-exaggerate the reaction women have for not accepting being ghosted, played, or treated poorly.You know the bubble is going to pop; the real fun is in never knowing when or why.The central issue is that BPD is based around feelings.

Having BPD is like living in a bubble floating in a hazy world of detachment.Primarily embraced by various forms of media (check its extensive TV Tropes page), it also manifests itself in everyday life.The trope lambasts women for having emotions, existing mostly to invalidate feelings and to over-exaggerate the reaction women have for not accepting being ghosted, played, or treated poorly.You know the bubble is going to pop; the real fun is in never knowing when or why.The central issue is that BPD is based around feelings.While these representations are regularly problematic, there are some that seize the essence of BPD and help to communicate its existence, flattering or otherwise.